What if my artists are performing at the same time?

artist management advice

What if my artists are performing at the same time?

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What can I do if two of my artists have show performances on the same day, and I’m not able to go from performance A to performance B?

Kishun, Holland

That’s a tough decision to make at times! I would always choose the one that has the potential for more business. Are there certain music industry personnel that you expect to be at one show over the other? Such as a label rep, a promoter, an agent, a booker? If so, try to be at that one so that you can chat with those people, build relationships, and work on potential business opportunities. 

If you aren’t expecting any industry people, just fans, then choose whichever one you think needs more help. Do they have enough hands to carry in and out all the equipment? Is one of them newer to the game and not sure how it works? Does one of them really need to improve their live performance more-so over the other one? Perhaps you haven’t seen one of them perform in awhile. 

Whichever the case. Perhaps you could ask someone to go to the other show on your behalf. Have them report back to you with how things went. If it’s a documentation sort of thing, get them to take photos or videos for you while they are there. 

Hope this helps! 

Comment below if you have other tips for Kishun!

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Jamie New
jnewjohnson@gmail.com

I started my career planning educational workshops with some of North America's top artist managers, then moved on to manage commercial radio and internationally touring artists independently. I'm addicted to learning and love sharing what I learn with you here.

2 Comments
  • Rick Imus
    Posted at 21:07h, 15 July Reply

    Make no apology for asking a colleague or junior acquaintance to help you in this case. They might appreciate the opportunity to see things from the manager’s view.

    In a perfect world, we’d be slightly ahead of the wheel and proactively look for an associate who could help in moments like this.

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